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Monday, April 15, 2013

Monday Gunday: Buy a Gun Day

So, today is Buy A Gun day. 

Now technically, I did not buy a gun today. I received it some time last month, and I am still in the process of paying it off. I was able to do this because I bought it from a gunnie who knew I wanted a semi-auto rifle and was kind enough to let me pay for it in installments.

Still, this is my newest addition:  a Norinco SKS. For the non-gunnies, that means it is a rifle of Russian design (the AK-47 replaced it), but this model was produced in China. Technically that makes it a Type 56 and not a true SKS but blah blah woof woof.  The fact remains that it's a Commie gun designed be used by illiterate peasant conscripts in harsh weather conditions, so I can't possibly break it by accident.


Per Wikipedia: "The SKS is a Soviet semi-automatic rifle chambered for the 7.62x39mm round, designed in 1943 by Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov. Its complete designation, SKS-45, is an initialism for Samozaryadnyj Karabin sistemy Simonova, 1945 (Russian: Самозарядный карабин системы Симонова, 1945; Self-loading Carbine of (the) Simonov system, 1945), or SKS 45. In the early 1950s, the Soviets took the SKS carbine out of front-line service and replaced it with the AK-47; however, the SKS remained in second-line service for decades. It is still used as a ceremonial arm today."

I was also able to get 100 rounds for it for less than an arm and a leg, thanks to judicious use of Gunbot. I have yet to shoot it, but now that I finally have the gun un-cosmolined and plenty of ammo, I am going to take it to my local range as soon as the weather cooperates.  I have no idea if this weapon has ever been fired in battle, but looking at its stock it's clearly seen some kind of use -- but perhaps it's just been banged around the barracks and occasionally taken to the range.

Right now, the only change I have made to it is the addition of a limbsaver pad over the metal skullcrusher buttplate. I do plan to add a bayonet to it, because A) bayonets are AWESOME, and B) the SKS originally came with one.  I am trying to resist the urge to tart it up, mainly because 922r compliance is expensive and annoying.

I have yet to name it, mainly because I'm not sure if I should give it a Russian or Chinese name. If you are inclined to make a suggestion, please feel free so to do, but kindly keep in mind that I firmly believe all firearms are boys*, so male names only, please.



* They are phallic, simple to operate, and go "bang" when you push their button. Knives, however, are female: they are subtle, require more skill to use, and will cut you if you mishandle them.

36 comments:

  1. are you going to do the firing pin / spring mod? that also gives you two more American part towards the stupid import rule (if you then want to add a stock and extended magazine); the fire pin mod makes the pin no long floaty, and about a zero chance of slam fire... $40ish. sweet.

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  2. This is the first I've heard of this mod. Link please?

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  3. The Chinese had TWO Type 56's. Oddly, the Type 56 rifle is the SKS and the Type 56 Carbine is the AK.

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  4. Huh. For me they can be either way: My Nagant is definitely female. It's stock reminds me of a ballet dancer: Long and lithe, with surprising strength hidden within it, and yet my 870 is unquestionably male, with heavier lines.



    One is Svetlana, and the other is Regan. You can guess which is which.

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  5. Russian, Chinese...or how about Nork? I'm sure it's been said before but, "Kim Long Dong" is a mighty boyish name.

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  6. Snerk!

    I am ashamed to admit that vaguely dirty names never even occurred to me!

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  7. If the rifle was originally imported assembled, 922(r) doesn't apply. That rule only applies to assembling guns in the U.S. that were not importable whole.

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  8. Now I am even more confused! o_O

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  9. Or you could take a stab at superhero names, and call it "The Comrade." That's a nod to BOTH countries.

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  10. I got a 'you were not home' note from UPS trying to deliver a case of chinese surplus sks ammo does that count?

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  11. Here you go.



    http://www.brownells.com/rifle-parts/bolt-parts/firing-pins/sks-enhanced-firing-pin-prod24637.aspx

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  12. YOU DONT NEED A PIG STICKER ON THE PIECE TO QUOTE THE GREAT BILL MAULDIN "IF YOU ARE CLOSE ENOUGH TO STICK HIM YOU WERE CLOSE ENOUGH TO SHOOT HIM FIVE MINUTES AGO !"

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  13. Nice purchase !
    I always smile when I see formerly communist/socialist firearms being used to defend capitalism and our liberty.

    Please keep up the good work.

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  14. That's the idea.

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  15. "If the rifle was originally imported assembled, 922(r) doesn't apply."


    That is emphatically not true. Please do not give my friends advice that can get them thrown in prison. Thank you.

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  16. Modern Chinese SKS imports are almost never military surplus; they were made for commercial sale.

    True story: One of the guys working for an importer was getting a tour of a Norinco factory and these SKSs coming down the line were just pristine; nicer than any he'd pulled out of a crate in the states with their dinged-up stocks...

    He wondered where these special rifles were headed for until they got down to the end of the line where stuff was getting sorted for packing and shipping, and the finished guns were just being chucked into piles on pallets like cordwood, with not a care to how it was denting the stocks.

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  17. Now I have you on record calling me your friend! :D


    Would you mind explaining what I must do to comply with 922(r)? Every time I read it, my eyes swim and my head hurts and I think "If it weren't for my horse, I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

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  18. From what I can tell the law states that:

    1. Only licensed manufacturers may assemble or import these 4 rifles.
    2. You may disassemble or assemble any such rifle for the purpose of service or repair.
    3. You may replace any part of that rifle, but you may not get a new part that wasn't already on the rifle. So you can replace the buttstock (since it already had one, as long as you don't use any of those parts to assemble a new rifle), but you can't get a bayonet (I think it counts as a muzzle attachment?) unless at least 10 of the parts on that list are made in the US of A.

    Considering that the SKS is known as the hillbilly hog rifle in some parts of the country the formulation of that law is pretty bullshit. Why would an SKS be less "suitable for sporting purposes" than an AR-15? I smell arms industry pork.

    P.S: Judging by the picture the SKS you have is a blondie, ie a commercially produced rifle. They use different wood, that's lighter in colour and softer than the military version, for the stock.

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  19. The obvious answer is "Simon." (The second S stands for Simonov)
    +1 for Simon Tam, which is a Chinese last name and also nerdy Firefly tie in.

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  20. You win the internets for today, sir!

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  21. Let me see if I have this straight:


    If I had received the rifle with the bayonet already attached, that would be fine, but I'm breaking the law if I put one on it to return it to its original configuration?

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  22. re: Bayonet. Correct. Chinese SKSs are commercial weapons and not covered by the BATFE exemption for Curios and Relics like Eastern European (or documented old Chinese SKSs.)

    About 922(r): A rifle, for BATFE purposes, contains a certain number of 'parts'. (This is 'parts' as a legal term, not an actual parts count of the rifle.) If 10 or more of those parts are imported, it is an imported rifle. Imported rifles may not have evil features.

    There's a good breakdown at Tapco's site (http://www.tapco.com/section922r/) of exactly what this means to you. Basically, if you want to have evil features on your rifle, it needs to have ten or fewer imported parts (or, put another way, seven or more American-made parts.)

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  23. So it really IS about making sure that Americans arms & accessories companies getting their cut of that sweet import market.

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  24. To my untrained eye. Yes. If I remember my history right the law was introduced because in the late 80s cheap norinco rifles (SKS primarily) were flooding the lower priced segment and cutting american companies out of the "american underclass in need of a cheap rifle for target shooting and supplementary hunting" part of the market. Of course they couldn't have that.

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  25. Please go with the consensus. I studied this two years ago when assembling a rifle from a kit, but enough people here have refuted it that I see I need re-education.


    I apologize for the confusion and potentially crime-inducing advice.

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  26. Listen to Tam.

    One good, inexpensive mod is adding a Mojo peep sight. Most folks shoot better with a peep sight, and you won't ruin the lines of the rifle.

    @akz: Nagant- ballet dancer?! Hee. Okay.

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  27. One of those dancers from the Volga, with thighs that can crush walnuts...

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  28. No, it's because 922(r) came about via Executive Order during the Bush Sr. administration. Because GCA '68 instituted a "sporting purposes" test for imported firearms, the Executive branch, via BATFE, is free to determine what constitutes a firearm that is 'particularly suited for sporting purposes.


    While there wasn't legislative traction for a national AWB in Congress in the late '80s, a de facto AWB on imported guns could be done by executive order, which Bush and Bennett promoted as a step in fighting the War on (Some) Drugs. Presumably, what was enacted with the stroke of a pen could be rescinded likewise, should we ever get a pro-2A president.


    The '89 Bush Import AWB was used as the template for the '94 domestic AWB, which has since sunset, of course, leaving us in that weird limbo we were in between '89 and '94, where folding stocks are dangerous, but only if they're imported...

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  29. Norinco SKS imports weren't cut off because of 922(r). They were cut off because a Clinton administration directive cut off the import of ammunition and semiautomatic weapons from China because the Chinese were big meanies or something. This is why you can still get Chinese pump shotguns, but not those neat little Walther Olympia target clones or Norinco 1911s anymore.

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  30. Imagine trying to keep up with this stuff at work. "And don't mess up, little Tamara, or we all go to prison!" :o

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  31. Yeesh. Whatever slim desire I had to be an FFL has since evaporated.


    And given how tall you are, I find it funny that someone calls you "Little Tamara." ;)

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  32. Very worth it -- the SKS isn't really safe with US commercial ammo without it. HOWEVER, it doesn't change your 922(r) parts count, so far as I know, because it doesn't involve parts from the Evil List of Doom.

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  33. Erin, hit me up direct. It is VERY confusing, and I see at least three different mistakes made by different people in trying to answer it. Long story short, Yes, 922(r) applies to you, No, it does not apply to restoring a rifle to a configuration that is CURRENTLY legal or to a configuration that that individual rifle in your hands was legally imported in, but, YES you can add a bayonet and a buttpad -- the rifle was legally imported with a bayonet, and ATF doesn't care about buttpads.

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  34. Bunny -- 922(r) is both more complex AND simpler than you've described. Your interpretations of the law and how ATF enforces it are wholly mistaken. Not surprising -- ATF tries to be as clear as mud.


    1. "Assembly" has nothing to do with FFL status, period. Anyone who "assembles" an imported shotgun or semiauto rifle in an Evil Nasty Scary Bad configuration is in trouble. Anyone who swaps enough immigrant parts for 'Murican Made parts (but only those parts on the Big List of Evil Parts That Cause Impotence count) is 922(r) exempt, because magically the rifle becomes "American made", and 922(r) doesn't apply in that case at all.


    2. Irrelevant -- see #1. If the configuration is One Of The Cursed Ones, it doesn't matter who does so, it's illegal. Even if you are taking it apart for cleaning and reassembling it. That's because it's not written as a "possession" ban, but an "assembly" ban. One caveat -- see #3;


    3. Flat out incorrect. You add anything you like; so long as you either transmogrify the rifle into a "Made in USA" rifle by removing Evil Nasty Bad Foreign Parts (thus removing it from 922(r) oversight), or you are assembling it into EITHER the configuration that individually serial numbered rifle was legally imported in OR a configuration that is legal to import it in when you configured it that way. (Once the rifle is legally configured under either of the last two standards, you may do DIRECT replacement of parts, even if those new parts wouldn't be legal for import today. . . because the "legal configuration" gets grandfathered in.) Also, a bayonet is a bayonet, not a "muzzle device". Bayonets are also not on the 922(r) List of Evil Parts That Cause Cancer, but because of import configuration rules (which can change daily without notice), I would use a bayonet only on a rifle that is either 922(r) exempt ('Murica!), or one that is (in the eyes of ATF) in original import configuration where that config included a bayonet.


    There are websites that will let you date WHEN your rifle was made and likely imported, based on markings.

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  35. Not really. People started screaming that, "So now, if I inadvertently add a Canadian made flash hider to my AR15, I'm a felon?!?"

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